Tuesday, November 12, 2013

British Limbers in 28mm

Are there items that you avoid putting into the painting queue?  Well, for me, limbers and limber teams top my list of units on which to procrastinate.  Not sure why limbers present such a mental block.  Perhaps it is because these are ancillary units with no real combat value?  Limbers are not much different from painting four (or six) cavalry plus a gun but, still, I really do not take much enjoyment from painting the darn things.

Be that as it may, I have two Front Rank British limber teams and limbers that have been in The Lead Pile for far too long.  These two limbers were part of my 2013 Project Declarations made back in January.  Back then, I challenged myself to paint these two limbers and get them out of the The Lead Pile and onto the table.  I have yet to put the traces on the teams since I was not satisfied with the look of the wire traces that came with the models.     


   

22 comments:

  1. Very nice models and painting. I have to agree with you about limbers, Jon. I have a few for my French Russian, and Austrian armies. The only ones that make it onto the table regularly are the Austrian ones, and that's just because i use them in lieu of crew for the Austrian "cavalry" batteries. I don't particularly enjoy painting them, and they're expensive for a non combatant unit. They also take up a lot of space on the table, which is partially good as it limits crowding artillery in a small space.

    Anyway, I think it's good to have a few, but insanity to have one for every battery!

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    1. Peter, we are in agreement. Looking back through your NKE collection, a limber and team is really not much different than painting and fielding a chariot. And you have fielded a multitude of those. It must be the NON-COM status that turns the limber work into drudgery.

      I do enjoy seeing the limbers on the gaming table, though.

      Thanks for your insight!

      Delete
  2. Begs the question "why"? Do you use them in the game (maybe to represent limbered artillery? Or are they there to look nice?

    Either way, I think you've done a great job on them!

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    1. Hi Johnny,
      Yes, the limbers are fielded to represent limbered artillery and to increase the footprint consumed by artillery and train.

      Limbers do look nice on the gaming table too. I guess my answer to your question is both!

      Delete
  3. Nice job Jonathan!! I suppose it depends on what rules you use and the scenario your playing. Sometimes limbers are needed, sometimes they're not?? But you still need a few, just encase????

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    1. Thanks, Ray! I have a whole pile of lead, just in case!

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  4. I like these, if nothing else they add to the scene on a table

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    1. That they do! I do like seeing limbers deployed on the gaming table.

      Delete
  5. I know what you mean about limbers and cavalry in general for me. These were well worth the effort though. Best, Dean

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    1. Thank you, Dean. Comforting to know that I am not alone in limber avoidance.

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  6. Hi Jon, they look great, I think limbers always repay the effort once you see them on the table. I was interested to see drivers in what I suppose is the Woolwich leather fatigue cap. I checked out the Front Rank catalogue when I saw your models and saw their drawings. A nice variant on the traditional Tarleton helmet look.

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    1. Thanks, Jonathan! For the headgear, I thought I would put the RHA train in tarleton and the foot train in cap. Perhaps, I should mix and match with the next limber team?

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  7. Lovely work, Jonathan! I do think they're worth the trouble and especially a set as nicely done as yours. In any engagement where the guns are coming up, you're set.

    I'm hard pressed to think what your hand might come to rest on in the lead mountain. Does the mountain need a bit of a refill?

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    1. Thanks, Monty! Still easy pickings from the lead pile.

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  8. I really like limbers and yours look great! Reminds me I need to actually do some of my own.

    Christopher

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    1. Thanks, Christopher. I guess we are both members in good standing in the Limber Procrastinators Club!

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  9. Nice. I have not yet purchased limbers for my guns in either medieval (Burgundians) or Texian Revolution (Mexicans). I would like to work scenarios where the trains are attacked by cavalry. That would be a great addition, considering the turns it might take for a gun to unlimber. Thanks for posting.

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    1. Thanks!

      Limbers tend to be the last painted for me. Most of my horse and musket projects do eventually get around to including them.

      Your scenario idea is a good one. In more tactical games, the limbers are sent out of harms way during action. When needed, the limbers must return to the gun and spend additional time limbering up. Do they get away or get caught by the cavalry? Could be a nail-biting situation for the gunners and limber team.

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