Sunday, July 31, 2022

Look! I Painted Something!

In a tip of the cap to one of Stew's recent ramblings on blog content at A Terrible Loss of Lead and Wealth, I offer up a Look - I painted something post.

Mustering out from the painting desk today are a dozen horsemen from the French Raugrave Cavalerie Regiment.  Figures are from Eureka Miniatures.

I thought these were the last of the French cavalry figures from my big Christmas restock of Eureka Miniatures back in December.  As is often the case, I was wrong.  A careful rummage through The Lead Pile surfaced another dozen French cavalry troopers.  Hooray!  These newly-found figures will go into the production queue with a goal of mustering out as the Colonel-General Cavalerie Regiment.  Inspired by David's recent, superb flagwork for this regiment (see French Cavalry Standards - Colonel-General Cavalerie Regiment), a redcoated regiment is just what I need. 
Speaking of David's superb flagwork, his barrage of cavalry flags led to a series of misfortunes on Saturday.

With enough newly raised regiments to warrant printing up another flag set, I set to work creating the set of flags.  With the sheet finished, the flagsheet was sent to the printer.  The flags printed but the color blue was not rendering.  Was the color cartridge out of ink?  The printer status suggested the cartridge was still mostly full.  Hmm.  Were the printer heads or cartridge contacts plugged?  They all looked OK but I gave each a good swab anyway.  I tried again.  Still not blue. Perhaps the printer heads were misaligned?  I aligned them.  Nope still no color. 

Off to the store for new ink cartridges.  Back again.  Still no color.  Sigh.  A call to tech support suggested that the printer heads were damaged and ought to be serviced and replaced.  Well, the cost of sending the printer out for repair was almost the equivalent cost to purchasing a new printer.  What did I do? Purchasing a new printer seemed reasonable.

With an in-house supply of ink cartridges, I wanted to purchase a printer with the same ink cartridge specs.  Having found several contenders, I went out to buy one.  The store had the correct printer so I bought one and brought it home.  

Installation became a small nightmare as the printer screen kept issuing a "Printer photo tray" blocked error.  No way past this error and the tray showed no sign of blockage or jam ("jam"?  is this another variation on Stew's PB&J posts?).  I digress...

Another call to tech support in Bangalore was met with a long pause as "Bob" searched the printer knowledge base.  After several minutes wait, Bob came back onto the line to say that the tray is defective.  Return the printer to the store from which I purchased it and get another.  Oh, and good luck!

Well, back to the store I go with the inoperative printer in the opened box.  After I explained the situation and my call to India, the guy in customer service said, "let's get you a new one."  After exchanging printers, back home I went with the new package.  

After unpacking and setting the new printer up, installation began.  Less than 15 minutes later, the new printer was being put through its paces on diagnostics and printing test pages.  All is working but duty calls to other pressing matters like preparing dinner for guests.

Now, time to give the new printer a test run with an assortment of Dave's flags.

Whew!           

44 comments:

  1. How big must your lead pile be, that you forget whole units? 😆
    Impressive looking lads. The Raugrave Regiment are on my to do list as they were at both Rossbach and Minden. Trouble is I forgot to order horse grenadiers.

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    1. On The Lead Pile, there are some questions left unanswered...

      Glad you like my rendition of Raugrave. When I decided to field a French army, I ordered more than needed for Du Roi. Happy to have pressed those figures into service especially for a unit seeing significant action.

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  2. It's a ludicrous situation that buying a new printer is cheaper than getting the old one repaired. Mind you it's often cheaper to buy a new printer than replacing printer cartridges!
    I bet your support guy wasn't called "Bob".......;-)
    Neil

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    1. Neil, with the price of ink cartridges, I wager companies could make a profit giving away the printer while still charging current prices for ink.

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  3. A great looking regiment. I had issue with my printer last year and like you bought a new one as it was cheaper than repair costs

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    1. Thanks, Neil! We live in a disposable society but don't throw out your figures!

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  4. They look great Jonathan, and that colour combination is always one of my favourites. I went through a similar situation as you but ended up getting a different brand and sacrificing three cartridges. The cost of them is ridiculous and I'd love to know the actual mark-up. I also just replaced an oven where the cost of a brand new one with a five-year warranty was $50 more than repairing the existing appliance. Hopefully the old one will be recycled as there is a fair amount of metal in there.

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    1. Thanks, Lawrence! Raugrave does wear a fine uniform.

      Ink cartridge pricing is ridiculous but evidently the market can bear it.

      Hard to believe that a big ticket item like an oven can be more economical to replace than to repair but I know this first hand as well.

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  5. Very nice unit, Jon.

    For some reason, printers either work perfectly or are infused with evil spirits! I'm glad you were able to get one that works finally.

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    1. Thanks, Greg!

      With electronics, they seem to either fail straight out of the box or work flawlessly. QC seems to be a constant struggle.

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  6. I switched printer brands. It was the last straw to get 5 printed pages and run out of ink in the new cartridge. Using a tankless Epson for a year and no regrets. Most recent printed items were the rules '7 Days to the Rhine River' and C. J Rawkins' book on the Swedish Army of the Napoleonic Wars.

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    1. Thanks, Joe, for sharing your printer experience. If this new model does not work out, I will consider the tankless Epson.

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  7. A fine addition, the blue and yellow is a striking combination. Printers are the spawn of the devil, who you also have to sell your soul to when you need new ink, mine merrily prints away while the computer says it's offline 🤔

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    1. Thanks, Phil! Selling one's soul to pay the devil for ink is no small understatement!

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  8. Lovely unit, on first glance I thought they were 20mm figures, due to the elegant proportioning. Re the printer, we are so used to things working out of the box these days, that a dud feels twice as much the nuisance that it ever did!

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    1. Thanks, Norm! Eureka figures (especially the cavalry) are overgrown 15s. they are nicely proportioned and the horses are my favorites. While I add different manufacturers' infantry to this project, only Eureka cavalry take to the field in my armies.

      Even if the device does not work out of the box (which it should!), the process for return and replacement is swift and relatively painless.

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  9. Lovely addition to the French horse. Seeing the bearskins and the blue coats, I was wondering if this were one of the foreign (German) regiments. The tale of the printer odyssey seems a depressingly familiar one when it comes to these essential, but temporal, peripherals.

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    1. Thanks, Ed! I agree that the bearskins and blue coats suggest a foreign regiment to me too.

      Seems as if printer failures are not uncommon!

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  10. Beautiful looking unit sir!
    Warm regards

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  11. These are great looking cavalry as usual Jon!

    The printer issue is indicative if how we live today, built in obsolescence and replace instead of repair. It's often the case that a cheap printer, complete with toner, is cheaper than buying new toner...bloody ridiculous.

    Of course, the reason the printers are so cheap is, the manufacturers have exported all their customer service jobs to cheap economies, like where Bob is!

    A few years ago I was the service manager for a security company with hakf a dozen maintenance techs reporting to me. We had one guy about my age who would pull a lock or card reader apart, test all the components, go to a supplier, buy a 30c widget, rebuild the device and reinstall it. Cost of repair, 30c parts, $8.95 consumables and $180 labour for the three hours it took. The techs in their twenties pulled out the faulty reader, threw it away and installed a new one. Cost of repair, a $200 reader and one hour labour....guess which our company preferred them to do? Tony the older guy cleared four to sispx faults over day and the younger guys eight or ten!

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    1. Thanks, Keith!

      Your personal experience mirrors scenarios I see too. Much faster to replace than repair and less costly too with current labor rates. Much seems outsourced today including manufacturing and support.

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  12. A very determined looking unit. Good to see you are back in the painting groove, if not the printing groove.

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  13. A fine looking regiment Jonathan!

    Christopher

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  14. And nice job you did too. 😀
    It’s true that we live in a McDonald’s disposable world where if something breaks we toss it aside and just get another. Just like wives (I’m joking!!!).

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    1. Thanks, Stew! "Just like wives?" There may be a kernel of truth in there somewhere...

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  15. Sorry to hear about the printer saga; and how absurd that it is cheaper to buy new than repair! What a mad world we live in...

    The unit looks very good. :-) I haven't yet done the standard for Raugrave (aka Volontaires Liegois) but if you would like it I can probably put it together pretty quickly. Charrié describes it in enough detail for me to recreate it, I think.

    Cheers,

    David.

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    1. The economics of our global supply chain at work. Manufacturing in a low cost region with repairs in a high cost region results in full landfills.

      Glad you like the cavalry! A banner for them would be much appreciated!

      I printed out a sheet of flags this morning and plan set to work flagging my French cavalry having a standard bearer in the ranks.

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  16. Oh - and thanks for the compliment on my latest standard, that of Colonel Général. :-)

    D.

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    1. My pleasure! Thank you for all of your hard work!

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  17. You are actually one of the few bloggers where I regularly look at your painting posts. A nicely done unit with noticeable but also muted colors. You are increasing my interest in SYW, which is dangerous ;)

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    1. Thank you, Sir! If I continue posting SYW topics, perhaps, one day, you will be pushed into action on a SYW project.

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  18. Lovely looking unit, I had to buy an A3 scanner/ printer during lockdown so that I could work from home, at that cost it'll still be cheaper to fix it I think!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thank you, Iain! Seems printers are a common source of pain. When your printer has a need for repair, it will be interesting to see which is more cost effective: buy or repair.

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  19. Hurrah for an “I painted something” post…
    You have certainly painted more than I have recently 😁…
    Printers… yup!… it always annoyed me the my last printer actually cost less than a couple of ink refills… mind you it did me well… for four years until I dropped it 🙄.
    I hate the disposable society we live in… but of course I would… I am a man who has shoes that are older than some of my colleagues.

    All the best. Aly.

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    1. Thanks, Aly!

      You are not alone, my friend. I, too, have shoes older than colleagues and unpainted figures older than grown children!

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  20. Fine work as always Jon. Having worked in the design industry the whole disposable thing drives me mad. Our current printer and laptop (windows 11) no longer want to talk to each other. Luckily I have my older laptop for when I need to print stuff. At some point I'm sure I will need to replace it despite it still being perfectly fine. Some years ago our cooker door broke on Xmas day and it was cheaper to replace the whole cooker than just the door!

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    1. Thanks! My wife’s laptop, once upgraded to WIN 11, would no longer communicate with her printer. After many attempts to troubleshoot, we discovered that this is a “feature” of WIN 11 and this particular printer. Now her printing jobs are sent to my printer. I can still print to her printer though.

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  21. Excellent unit! Is it possible that I forgot to write here? It's nice to see more of those special regiments.

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    1. Thank you! Yes, it is possible you forgot to comment. Glad you did!

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  22. And this is why I print everything at work. I have to justify it by using it for work purposes, but still... I'll have to do a Lookit I Painted Something post because I had a paint-and-take last week to which no one showed up. Painted two goblins, so it wasn't a total loss.

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    1. When I was in the Workforce, printing was carefully monitored. No chance of personal printing in the office.

      As an homage to Stew’s PB&J post linked to above, I encourage you to forge ahead with a Look it post of your own.

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