Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Rome v Carthage - To the Strongest!

Two weeks ago, Kevin and I reconvened at Scott's to refight a Second Punic War battle fought the month before.  In that first match, Rome defeated Carthage handily.  Kevin, as the Carthaginian general figured his outnumbering army ought to be able to defeat the smaller, Roman army on the field.  To test his theory, Kevin took command of the Carthaginians in an encore presentation while I returned to my role as the Roman general.  The Carthaginian Army being larger must lose 12 tokens before the army breaks.  The smaller Roman Army may only lose 9 tokens before breaking. 

Let's see how the battle played out. 
Kevin surveys his Carthaginian Army
Carthage moves first and the army advances
The Roman legion in the center advances
 to meet the enemy
The Carthaginians advance all across the battlefield
Rome attempts to outflank the Carthaginian right
 but is broken in the process.
A broken wing can no longer attack... 
The Roman right attempts to turn
the Carthaginian battleline. 
Heavy fighting in the center as the two armies collide.
Casualties are heavy but the Romans hold on.
Whoa-ho!  The Roman cavalry commander, on the left wing,
 seizes the unoccupied enemy camp!
That, despite not being able to attack.
Ground is gained as stands disperse.
With several successful 2-to-1 attacks,
the Carthaginian Army breaks 
Well! Carthage falls to defeat a second time with a score of 12 tokens to 5.  Another fun came with non-stop action throughout.  Always a pleasure pushing Scott’s beautiful troops across the table.  Early on, the Romans were very unlucky to lose their left cavalry wing at the hands of lowly Numidian cavalry.  Embarrassing.  The Roman cavalry general saved his reputation by fighting a cagey battle of maneuver to capture the Carthaginian camp.  I think that in itself yielded either three or four tokens and honors for the day.

In the final throes of battle, the Romans managed to maneuver into position to attack the enemy from both front and flank destroying their opposition.  Not once but twice!

Kevin thought the battle could have gone the other way.  Maybe next time?

42 comments:

  1. Rome marches ever onward, a fine looking battle and F2F too.

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    1. So true, Phil! Good to return to the table to in-person gaming with friends.

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  2. Good report and a good win for everyone's favourite Empire.

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    1. When I am in command, Rome is my favorite empire as well.

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  3. Oh, awesome armies! Thank you for fantastic report!
    Best regards

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  4. Lovely stuff. After the initial setback it sounds as though capturing the Carthaginian camp made all the difference.

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    1. Scott has many beautiful collections. Unfortunately for us, he spends most of his painting time painting for others rather rather than for himself.

      Taking the Carthaginian camp was key to victory since it diverted other forces in an attempt to retake it.

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  5. A nice looking game Jon ... If Kevin wants another rerun, he will need to make it best of five and hope to win three in a row!

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    1. Indeed! Kevin will have to go the route of best three out of five with a three game winning streak to take this series.

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  6. Splendid looking game and interesting result!
    Best Iain

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    1. Correct on both counts! Rome was quite unlucky early on but turned the battle around as Fate intervened.

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  7. Yes, a 3rd game would be interesting, but with a previous loss and a 12 to 5 token ratio in this game ….. are the Carthaginians doomed? Was that a points based game?

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    1. Carthage can win, for sure. Was this points based? Yes, it was.

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  8. The figures and table look great and it sounds like a good contest of wills, brains and dice.

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    1. Scott sets a handsome table. This was a good contest, no doubt. The outcome was uncertain until the final token.

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  9. What a beautiful game! I liked it very much!

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    1. Glad you liked it! Not as many and as colorful troops on the table as in your recent game.

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  10. Nice to see these beautiful miniatures fighting for … world supremacy I guess. Thanks for interesting AAR, Jonathan.

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  11. FtF and the Punic Wars. What a treat to see with all those fine troops. Thanks for sharing with us.

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    1. It was a treat pushing the troops around the table too! You are welcome, Joe!

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  12. Curious result, I had imagined the Cathaginians might have won the day using the last game as a guide. O well.

    A pretty table with even lovelier minis. Thanks Jon!

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    1. You know, I went back and re-read my account of the first battle and the result was almost the same! The Carthaginians lost their camp to raiders and then their center collapsed.

      Scott sets a handsome table that offers a real pleasure to fight over.

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  13. The smaller army has the tough job having to be anywhere but not able to be everywhere the enemy is. Yeah, that sounds right. 😀
    After years of owning the rules I still haven’t given it a play through. Embarrassing really. Ought to go reread it while I’m dabbling in rulesets.

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    1. Stew, the smaller, Roman amy won both these engagements. TtS! are especially easy to pick up if you have someone familiar with the rules provide a guiding hand for the first few games.

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  14. Nice looking game Jonathan. You must be revelling in the opportunity to play face to face again.

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    1. Getting in a F2F game or two over the last two months has been a big step toward a return to normalcy.

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  15. Nice looking game Jon those Romans are tough as I found out on holiday. I am still exploring the option to use sabot bases for some of my ancients ? Really I just need to buy the bases 🤔

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    1. The Romans experienced turn-around victories in thee two battle much to my delight. Yes, pick a ruleset you enjoy and dive into a massive rebasing project.

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  16. Awesome- you can't beat Carthaginians VS Romans- in any scale or rule set. Great game.

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  17. I love your ancient wargames. Great report and nice photos.

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    1. Thank you! The figures and game are courtesy of Scott and his collection.

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  18. Great setting and figures

    Great game, pictures and report

    Great result for Rome...

    Cheers, Ross

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  19. Good to see in-person, face to face gaming, Jonathan - particularly as splendid as this classic match-up. Haven't played Simon's rules yet, but looks fast paced and enjoyable.

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    1. Dean, it is good to be facing an opponent from across the table again. The rules are fast-paced and easy enough once you get the hang of them.

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  20. Thanks for sharing Jonathan, very impressive.

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  21. That's a beautiful looking game although the space between units I've never cared for from TtS which either by design or accident seems to often be the case. That said I've heard good things and people are having fun!

    Christopher

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    1. Thanks for your comments, Christopher. One challenge with grid-based games is having your grid and base-size match closely. Very difficult to do when you play with different scales of figures with different base sizes. On my table, units tend to be a bit more spaced out since my grid is made to fit the largest base width I use.

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