Saturday, March 18, 2017

Liccaner Grenz Battalion in 1859

Only after having planned the Montebello OB and pulled figures from their storage boxes, did I discover that the collection was light on Austrian grenz infantry.  Before looking through the boxes, having only one battalion of grenz seemed impossible.  The painting log should have been consulted. 
Given that shortfall and oversight, fielding an additional battalion seemed prudent.  With that inspiration, an 18 figure battalion of the Liccaner Grenz Regiment #1 rolls off the painting desk.  Figures are 15mm Old Glory from the infantry pack.  Good, solid figures even though a few of the command figures tend towards arriving sans heads.
By my count, fourteen battalions of grenz were present in June at Solferino/San Martino so I have some serious work to accomplish to bring these light troop contingents up to muster.  Luckily, only three battalions were present at Montebello and jaegers were put in place as reasonable substitutes.  Another battalion awaits in the painting queue.

22 comments:

  1. Great looking regiment Jonathan!

    Christopher

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  2. They look dynamic and superb, well done!

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    1. An assortment of poses, no doubt! One advantage to using Old Glory. Thanks for your encouragement, Phil!

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  3. Like lambs to the slaughter.... Wait, I'm playing Austrians next aren't I? I mean, what stalwart gentlemen to fend off the French menace!

    Great looking unit.

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    1. Thanks, Jake!

      You will be commanding the Austrians next time. Let's see if you make better use of the grenz than I. Mine were primarily fodder for your French juggernaut.

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  4. Great looking figures! I am highly envious!

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    1. Thank you, Ian! With black webbing, Austrian grenz are quick to paint and field. You could field a battalion or two in no time at all.

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  5. Another top looking unit Jonathan.

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  6. Great looking unit, as usual, Jonathan. So is Solferino going to be a long term project?

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    1. Thanks for your support, Mark!

      At the battalion level where each BMU is infantry battalion, Solferino might be too large to play at that level. Still, all options are on the table and it is a worthy goal.

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  7. I especially like the trumpeter, Jon. Too bad they gave up the brown coats, which would have been even more sensible in 1866! It is fascinating that the somewhat rickety institution of the Military Border was still in place so late!

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    1. Thanks, Peter!

      The Grenz still had a brown coat. When campaigning, they typically donned the white kittel. In 1866, most troops went into battle wearing the brown-grey greatcoat. Not as stylish as the white kittel.

      The border troops were not highly motivated in the 1859 conflict. One reason the Austrians had such difficulty. As experienced in my series on Montebello games, the Austrians seem unable or unwilling to stand up to the elan of the French.

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    2. Excellent unit. That answers my question on the brown coat. Good information!

      Ed

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    3. Ed, thank you and you are welcome for the uniformology.

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  8. Another of your lovely units, classic uniform.
    Best Iain

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