Friday, June 27, 2014

Samurai Battles Project in Review

My 17th Century Japanese Samurai Battles project began at the close of 2012 after a series of exciting games hosted by Jake.  Jake's games were such good fun and his collection so colorful that I could not resist fielding my own forces.  As often happens, the desire to field a few units as an addition turned into a full-fledged project.  Looking at the size of some of my collections, history does, indeed, seem to repeat itself.

One blog follower mentioned that he would enjoy seeing the Samurai Battles collection as it currently musters.  Well, Black Powder, this one is for you!

The project has been growing in a somewhat regulated manner.  That is, I build the forces in (what I consider) brigade strength.  Each brigade contains two light or missile elements (teppo/bow), two medium shock elements (spear/sword), one heavy shock foot (Samurai), and one heavy shock horse (Samurai).  At this stage, three complete brigades can be fielded with a forth nearing completion.  Banners for Ashigaru are the same within each element and brigade but Samurai banners are rendered individually.  


Now, for a montage of the collection...









While a good-sized force, much still remains to complete.

18 comments:

  1. These armies are really impressive, love the wonderful mix of colors Jonathan!

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    1. Thanks, Phil! The variety of colorful uniforms and banners is one of the appeals to this period.

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  2. Amazing! A true visual treat!

    Also looks like a great way to go blind... yikes! ;-)

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    1. Thanks, Jason! The colors are eye-catching, are they not?

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  3. Visually stunning roll call, Jonathan! Interestingly, your "brigade" composition is very similar to how I had my Japanese troops for my Siege of Haengju game. I think we are following the period fairly historically too as the 16th/17th C. Japanese armies were pretty much combine arms type of formations. Best, Dean

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    1. Thanks, Dean!

      Yes, I started down this organizational path after consulting several OBs and seeing my gaming partner's collection. Even though some battles had "brigades" of a different mix, six element organization seemed to make sense to me. As a bonus, about 100 figures comprises one brigade. Certainly attainable with a reasonable amount of time and effort.

      I am comforted to know that my choices have both history and you on my side!

      Appreciate your thoughtful comments.

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  4. Awesome sight of painted units/miniatures!
    Excellent work and project you have here Jonathan.

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  5. Thank you for indulging my request for these wonderful pictures. What an amazing looking collection Jonathan! Well-chosen colour scheme and really fantastic work on the banners and details. One feels as if flying over the battlefield of Sekigahara!

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    1. My pleasure, Soren and happy to oblige! The pictures do give a slight impression of a fly-over, don't they?

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  6. I stand amazed. How on earth do you stay so focused as to turn out something like this?

    Full marks, well done that man!

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  7. Now that's an impressive sight!

    Christopher

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  8. What a fabulous sight! I thought for a minute I'd dialed up Kurosawa's "Ran."

    I have some friends who look down on anything < 28mm. Your post shows the wee folk at their finest with their lovely mass effect. While the Sashimono is a PITA to paint, the end effect is brilliant.

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    1. Very kind of you, Monty!

      Each figure size has its own place on its own merit, don't you agree? Smaller figures, in larger quantities provide the visual impact just as you describe.

      For the sashimono, I keep the designs relatively simple and a little on the impressionistic slant. Makes painting them much easier.

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  9. Sakura fujisan-ji ni yukinokesshō no yōna sūji de, haru ni saku yōna utsukushi-sa ni!

    (at least that is what Googler translate makes of "In beauty like a cherry tree blooming in spring, in numbers like the snowflakes upon Mount Fuji!") Put otherwise: Awesome dude, Jonathan-san! :-)

    Curiously, my sister took Japanese in college, but I have no knowelege of the language and only limited insight into their culture.

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    1. Thanks, Peter! Outstanding sentiment even if the translation may be off!

      My youngest son took three years of Japanese in High School and spent three years in Japan teaching English at the High School level. My wife loves visiting Japan and the culture.

      Even with that, I am in the same boat as you!

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