Monday, September 4, 2017

Assyrian Mounted Archers #4

The fourth stand of Assyrian mounted archers trots off the painting desk.  Like the three stands going before, these figures are Wargames Foundry.
While four stands of bow-armed horsemen are a sizable contingent under Impetvs, each Neo-Assyrian army may field up to eight such stands.  That is a lot of cavalry!  With up to two Skythian/Cimmerian light cavalry, one Guard cavalry and five heavy chariots added into the mix, an Assyrian army can pack a lot of mobile punch.
Speaking of Skythian/Cimmerian light horse archers, I ought to add those into the painting queue.  With only three figures per stand, knocking out a stand of light cavalry should be an easy diversion from fielding the larger infantry units. 

28 comments:

  1. More Assyrian goodness, nice work!
    Best Iain

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    1. "More Assyrian goodness" indeed! Still much more to come. Thank you.

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  2. That is a nice mix of poses and colour combinatiions Jonarhan. Those Foundry figures never fail to please.

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    1. Mark, the Foundry figures really set the mark for other manufacturers even after all of these passing years. BTD's limited range of Assyrians is not bad either, nor are Newline Designs' figures.

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  3. Call that a lot of cavalry? You could get at least another two or three figures on those bases... I've heard the saying "less is more", but generally with wargames figures more is more.

    My main frustration with the Assyrians is getting decent sources on actual battles, rather than just having them descend like wolves on the fold.

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    1. You are quite right; more is more.

      Four is not a lot but there is method to my madness. I use the number of figures on a base to denote troop type. For medium cavalry, four figures do the job of representing one medium cavalry unit. Below is a link to an Assyrian heavy infantry unit:
      http://palousewargamingjournal.blogspot.com/2017/05/assyrian-heavy-infantry-i-in-25mm.html
      I packed them in on this one.

      While there may not be documentation of Assyrian battles, the same can be said of other earlier battles and wars. Perhaps my Assyrian Wars will be my Imagi-Nations project?

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  4. I wouldn't mind controlling an army with so many mobile units. Certainly be interesting, outflanking and feinting, trying to make the opponent commit before I withdraw and redeploying elsewhere.

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    1. Roy, I look forward to giving this army a battlefield trial soon. Then, we can see how they fight. My opponent is building up and Egyptian army. I think it may be more of maneuver, feint and jab force than the heavier Assyrians.

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  5. Wow, you're really cranking these out Jonathon. These guys look great. When do we get an army shot?
    Peter

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    1. Thanks, Peter! Seems to be a steady stream of Assyrians flowing off from the painting desk. Hopefully in battle, a steady stream of these lads will not be seen flowing off the battlefield!

      A group shot is on the horizon but I first must find a suitable breaking point to take a snapshot. Force composition is changing rapidly and I hate to leave units "almost done" out of the group photo.

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  6. Great looking figures again, Jonathan. The Assyrians really were a terror on the battlefield!

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    1. Thanks, Dean! I hope they terrorize my enemy on the gaming table too!

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  7. Really impressive--Assyrians and Cimmerians sounds like a terrifying combination! Would love to see those, too.

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    1. Much appreciated, Ed! Cimmerians in work but just barely...

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  8. I like the 'weathered' look of the horse coats. It may be an optical illusion to me, perhaps caused by those very same coats, but these figures seem to have a bit more 'going on' in paint terms than recent bases, they look like they might be a bit more of a demanding paint.

    The weight of this particular army in its storage tray must be very satisfying.

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    1. Norm, you have a discerning eye. The weathering on the horse blankets is due primarily to the Minwax stain I use as a finishing step in the painting process. the stain tends to tie the paintwork together an settles in the folds and recesses of the figure. This technique gives the finished figure more depth. The Assyrian horse displayed in earlier posts follow the same technique.

      The number of storage boxes needed for the project continue to grow...

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  9. Another impressive unit. I really enjoy seeing your Assyrian appear.

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    1. Thank you! I enjoy seeing them appear too!

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  10. More lovely figures Jonathon....I would like some of these in my wider ancient collection 😀

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    1. Thanks, Matt! These Assyrian horsemen are only a few mouse clicks away from being added into your ancients projects.

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  11. Very well done, and a nice variety of dynamic poses in this unit!

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    1. Thanks, Peter! The Assyrians are turning into a fun project. I thank you for inspiration.

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  12. Like the buff colour horse armour. Contrasts well with the uniform colours.

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