Thursday, November 20, 2014

15mm Risorgimento: Austrian I.R. 27/4

Following on the footsteps of the Risorgimento figure comparison featuring the newly acquired Lancashire figures, an 18 figure Austrian battalion marches off from the painting desk.  This battalion represents one of the 4th battalions detached from the 6th Austrian Corps to Benedek's 8th Corps at San Martino.  

Since I am away from my resources and working from memory, the presence of these 4th battalions puzzles me.  In the field, an Austrian infantry regiment contained three line battalions and one grenadier battalion.  The fourth battalion acted as a depot and typically was not present on the battlefield.  If that was the case, were these few 4th battalions mustered up for the campaign?  If not, what were these 4th battalions?  Perhaps, I can investigate once I return to my library.

Figures are Freikorps 15s.   

While the Freikorps figures looked small in comparison to the other manufacturers, on the gaming table, these size differences are not noticeable.  Next time I get the collection into battle, I must make a point of capturing game shots with all manufacturers in the same battle scene.

With the arrival of the Lancashire figures, I am anxious to get the figures into the painting queue and onto the painting desk.  The arrival of new figures always motivates me to get a few under the brush quickly.  Does the arrival of new figures have the same effect on others?  

18 comments:

  1. They look great. New figures sometimes prompt me to get paint on them, but I'm usually much more about getting into the groove of a project.

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    1. Thanks, Nate! Tell me more about your project grooves.

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  2. Beautiful unit Jonathan, the color scheme of light blue, white and the yellow flag is just eye candy. I can imagine an army of these in 15 will be impressive. I really like Mirliton, but don't mind mixing manufacturers, so it certainly would be very useful, and equally impressive, to have a few pictures of your army in action on the table.

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    1. Thanks very much, Soren!

      There is one BatRep (San Martino) showing some of the figures but I need to get this project back onto the gaming table. It might be interesting to snap a photo or two of the collection and compare with my earlier project status piece.

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  3. Very nice work Sir. Actually have you seen these ?

    http://www.hagen-miniatures.de/index.php/en/produkte/category/view/211

    I'm always reluctant to show a man a new period - but these are rather good.

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    1. Thanks, Conrad!

      I have seen those 1848 figures. First saw them on your fine blog. First rate figures, for sure. I might be able to use the cavalry in my project. This requires further investigation!

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  4. Marvelous painting job Jonathan...well done!

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    1. Thank you, Phil! Your comments very much appreciated!

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  5. Great looking troops, Jonathan. I really like the light blue trousers and white coat combo of the Austro-Hungarians. And as you say, once based and on the table, minimal differences in makers are hardly noticeable.

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    1. Thank you for your comments, Dean! The white tunic with cornflower blue trousers uniform combo is pleasing to the eye.

      Next time the project sees action I will take a photo or two to see if differences are noticeable.

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  6. Another great looking regiment, very nice job!

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  7. I love the blue and white uniforms! Double plus for the 1859 project because I'm completely ignorant of this period.

    Suffering from a touch of OCD, I strive to keep my painting in a FIFO line. I just got some Footsore Miniatures figures that are lovely. I may break my own rule! ;-)

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    1. FIFO would not work so well with me. You see, I have figures that came in 20 years ago and still hang about in The Lead Pile!

      What Footsore figures are you working on?

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  8. Looking good. I can't speak to this later era, but in 1809 the Austrians scraped the bottom of the barrel and them some mobilizing all kinds of Depot troops in both the Line and Grenz infantry regiments.

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    1. Thanks, Peter. Although not critical to my understanding of the campaign, the source of these 4th battalions is curious, nonetheless.

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