Wednesday, March 5, 2014

1799 Suvorov in Italy - The Russians

While thinking about dual purposing my Prussian SYW jaegers as Russian jaegers for my 1799 project, I was reminded that the Russian infantry have yet to receive flags.  I need to remedy that!  Thus far, the project musters twelve infantry battalions comprised of two combined grenadier battalions, four grenadier battalions, and six musketeer battalions.  All battalions received flags except for the combined grenadier battalions.  All figures are AB Miniatures.
Russian infantry arrayed on parade
Russian infantry arrayed on parade
Russian infantry arrayed on parade
Combined Grenadier battalions
Fanagoria Grenadier Regiment
Kursk Musketeer Regiment
Moscow Grenadier Regiment 
Smolensk Musketeer Regiment
Yaroslavl Musketeer Regiment
One of the difficulties was matching the Russian regiment given in Duffy's Eagles over the Alps with Mark Conrad's excellent and most useful translation of Viskovatov (link).  Also, with respect to flags, regiments listed differed either from Duffy or Conrad.

After a bit of checking and cross-checking, I came up with the following mapping;
  • Yaroslavl Musketeer RGT = Durosav Musketeer RGT
  • Kursk Musketeer RGT = Koursk Musketeer RGT
  • Smolensk Musketeer RGT = Scheikovsky Musketeer RGT
  • Moscow Grenadier RGT = Grenadier RGT Rosenberg
  • Fanagoria Grenadier RGT = Fanagoria Grenadier RGT
  • Miloradovitch Musketeer RGT = Aspheron Musketeer RGT
  • Tyrtov Musketeer RGT = Tula Musketeer RGT
  • Forster Musketeer RGT = Ferster (Tambov) Musketeer RGT
  • Jung-Baden Musketeer RGT = Butyrsk Musketeer RGT
  • Baranovsky Musketeer RGT = Nizovsk (Nizov) Musketeer RGT
Of course, I may have some incorrect but that will do for now.  Note that "hat" companies for Russian grenadier regiments actually wore the short mitre (think Prussian SYW fusilier) with the flank company wearing the tall mitre worn by grenadiers.  Elites in a grenadier battalion were not termed "grenadiers!" 

14 comments:

  1. Those look great. I love the mitre caps. One of the best looking pieces of head gear ever.

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    1. I am partial to the mitre too. I wonder about its practicality but it did look formidable.

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  2. Amazing collections, Jonathan. Very, very impressive work. I don't have any, but I can see why AB 18mm Napoleonics are the choice for many. Do they paint up any quicker than 28mm? They look great. Best, Dean

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    1. Thanks, Dean!

      As in most things, the answer is "it depends!" ABs typically take less time to paint than the same figure in 28 for the same period. That is, an 18mm Napoleonic figure takes less time than an equivalent 28mm Napoleonic figure. I find ABs have less exaggerated detailing so take a little longer than either Old Glory or Blue Moon. Of course, YMMV. Given that, with my aging eyes, I find the 28s easier to see and paint.

      With skilled hands, ABs paint up very well.

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  3. These are fantastic units, love the mitres...you've done an excellent work with them!

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    1. Thank you, Phil! I love the mitres too!

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  4. Oooooh, I *love * these, Jon! The earlier Russian Uniforms with their individual facing colors and the Miters for the greandiers would definitely be hopw I would have done my ERussians (in the shako though) if they were available way back then!

    The beautiful Russian flags are probably the best thing about the infantry, though. Did you just add the flags now? If so I am vexed (in the vexilogical sense!) that it took so long to get these fine lads properly tricked out.

    Working with Russian names can be very challenging - almost as bad as Polish ones. So many different translations from Russian with varying conventions for doing so over time can make it a night mare.

    Finally, I really enjoyed "Eagles over the Alps"; thanks again for a great book!

    Peter

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    1. Thanks, Peter! I really like the early Russian uniforms too. The reason these lads lacked flags was due to inertia. I hadn't pinpointed the translation between some of the names used in Duffy vs. Conrad vs. Oprey vs ...You get the idea. Also, I wanted enough battalions fielded to justify making and printing one flag sheet.

      Glad to hear you enjoyed Eagles Over the Alps! It is a very fine work.

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  5. Great work here, Jonathan! They're so sharp, all ranked up. There is something lovely about how black, green and white come together. And the flags are icing on the Russian teacake.

    Crosschecking Russian...that's not something you have to worry about when painting ancients!

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    1. Thanks, Monty! You have a keen eye for color. Aren't we always cross-checking Russian no matter what period or sport?

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  6. Very nice work! I do really like the look of the Russians in this period.

    Christopher

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    1. Thanks, Christopher! If our small sample likes the look of the early Russians, why do you suppose we don't see them more often on the battlefield?

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