Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Anatomy of a Project - Napoleonics in 28

Being out of town and away from the painting desk for the week, hobby activities are confined to reflection and reading.  No painting this week...

Given a recent influx of Napoleonic lead, I thought it might be a good time to take stock of the 28mm Napoleonic project.  What better way to see what I have accomplished than to deploy the forces on the table?  Often, it is easy to forget exactly what has mustered off the painting desk without holding an occasional Pass In Review.
First, a bit of project history.  This project first sparked to life in 2005 and then quickly went into a hiatus.  You see, this was a "buddy" project.  My friend had purchased several units of British and French Front Rank figures.  He wanted to field the French and asked me to buy out the British.  He envisioned painting these two forces for small Peninsular War actions.  Of course, I agreed.  Paint a few units and have some enjoyable games with a friend.  
After painting a few of the British infantry battalions, I noticed no progress on the French call up.  I continued to knock out a few units but after a few years, still no action on the French activation.      
Unfortunately, my friend became very sick and ended up selling his French figures to another buddy.  I finally came to the realization that if I planned to put this British force to work, they needed an opponent.  My solution?  Build a French force to oppose the British.   

Although never a priority project, after a little less than ten years, the project stands with two very playable forces.  This collection has actually seen combat on the gaming table in 2014.  Twice!

The British: 
At present, the British field 46 cavalry, 270 infantry, and 4 guns.




The French:
At present, the French field 50 cavalry, 240 infantry, and 4 guns.


 
What about the unpainted Napoleonic lead I mentioned at the top of the post? Well, here it is.  Two trays of unpainted lead.  Mostly Front Rank but other makes are in there too.  This alone would keep me busy for quite awhile.
For 2015, I want to make a dent in this Lead Pile.  Could I empty one of these boxes in 2015?  Unlikely, but worth a try.  

29 comments:

  1. Accumulation, that's the answer, and one which many wargamers forget. In these days of instant gratification the steady flow of figures into a project is frequantly ignored in the rush for new burn armies and club projects.
    Well done that man!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I couldn't agree more! I've seen many club based projects die because they lack long term vision and commitment - or because the people involved each only focussed on painting one of the sides of the troops in question.

      Delete
    2. Thank you, Gary! Raising (and painting) armies takes patience, for sure.

      Delete
  2. impressive sight of figures/units you have there Jonathan! I admire your patience working through each project at a time...another words you know what needs to be done first and then later, move on to your next project on your work bench and so on...

    cheers,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Phil! As you have seen, I juggle many projects simultaneously. Your observation is correct. I do tend to apply emphasis and energy to a few projects at one time. Over the course of a year, a number of projects see activity on the painting desk.

      Delete
    2. my concern is "burn out" painting so many figures with your projects during the year, mind you one can always take painting breaks and write instead, blog articles about your solo/group player games, book/wargame rules reviews etc....

      cheers

      Delete
    3. I guess I don't often feel painting burn-out but you are quite right. Painting is only one facet of our hobby.

      When other activities are occupying my time or work is too fatiguing, I may not make it down to the painting desk for a few days in a row. Perhaps, a two or three day break is all I need to recharge the painting batteries?

      Delete
  3. I'm speechless Jonathan! So impressive, so much work!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good man Jonathan. I've found myself in similar fixes before, so now I just collect both sides as a matter of course.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quite right! Even when it is a group project it is good insurance to field both sides for times when the other armies are unavailable.

      Delete
  5. It's good to get the stuff out and take a good look at what you have achieved and it inspires for the next push. Lots left to do but with the very high standard you work too it's going to look fantastic (not that it does not already)

    Ian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lots left to do, for sure. I agree, Ian. It is easy to lose sight of what has been accomplished unless the figures get out on the table occasionally.

      Delete
  6. Nice to see them all on the table!

    ReplyDelete
  7. VERY impressively sized collection Jonathan! It's a rarely practiced but highly rewarding discipline to pull out all the figures of one particular collection and just sit down for a moment and enjoy the accomplishment. Remarkable work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Soren!

      Having tallies in a database are not the same as deploying all the troops on the table for a parade, is it? doing this, i get a much better sense of the strengths and weaknesses in my painting progress.

      Delete
  8. Some great looking troops, and a horribly large looking unpainted box as well....Good Luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know. The boxes of unpainted lead are a bit shameful. In my defense, buying the figures on sale is a prudent step. Right?

      Delete
  9. Very impressive collection of Napoleonics, Jonathan. Also, quite interesting the way it came about. Sorry to hear about your buddy's illness having made him sell of his figures, but you really took up the slack. You still have quite more to add if you want to, and your leisure. Regards, Dean

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the comments, Dean.

      Once a project reaches the critical mass of gamability, then painting schedule is much less pressing. Painting is a leisure activity anyway, right?

      Delete
  10. Vemeiro senses tingling! I really like the looks of these, makes me want to upscale my 1812 Americans!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now there is a thought! Vimeiro in 28. We have done it so many times in 15, tackling it in 28 would be a snap. Of course we may only be able to focus a part of the battle at any one time. Remember how Vimeiro map in 15mm took the entire 12' x 6' table? Ah, great memories!

      Delete
  11. That is dedication, Jonathan! And the spectacular results speak for themselves. One of the many things I love about blogging is to see how others work. For sheer painting diversity, I can't think of anyone who tops you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Monty!

      Yes, I do have a diversity of projects, don't I? I sometimes envy for those fellows who can concentrate on only one or two periods. Then, I read a book and get the motivation to start ANOTHER project!

      A few weeks ago we did a Punic War Impetvs game in 28. This weekend, an Impetvs game during the Renaissance is on the docket; in 28 too.

      Delete
  12. Two nicely matched forces. Double or triple them and you'll have real 28mm Napoleonic armies! :-)


    Seriously, even sticking to a single scale, no troops after 1815 and no Tricornes, it's still a challenge to have all the guys see the tabletop from time to time. So what do I do? - Why, buy and paint more, of course!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Double or triple the size? Well, I have my work cut out me for then, don't I?

      Buy More/Paint More - that could be our mantra!

      Delete
  13. I collect both sides as well after a similar experience to yours. What a brilliant collection - it almost makes me question my resolve to only do Napoleonics in 6mm. You make it look very tempting. The pie charts and graphs are also impressive and suggest a highly disciplined mind (quite unlike mine, which would probably resemble a nest of squirrels under an MRI scan). :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michael, question your resolve! Napoleonics in 28 is a visual treat.

      As for the graphics, they are just byproducts of keeping detailed figure counts. Once you have the data captured, everything else is elementary!

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...