Tuesday, October 28, 2014

French Artillery for the 1799 Project

Finally!  After nearly half a year, a few more figures for the 1799 project made it to the painting desk.  The last figures to see the brush in this project were two Austrian grenadier battalions back in May (see Austrian Grenadiers).  The 1799 project is coming together at a leisurely pace which is all right with me.  While the project is focused on the Italian and Swiss conflicts with the Suvorov led Russian/Austrian coalition, I imagine using the Austrian and French in battles in the earlier northern Italian campaigns of 1796-1797.  Recently having re-read parts of Boycott-Brown's excellent Road to Rivoli, makes me long for another refight of Rivoli.  Fought Rivoli on more than one occasion and it was good fun every time.   

Like all of the figures thus far in this project, the French artillery are AB Miniatures.  Dozens of French artillery from the primary 15mm Napoleonic project could have been pressed into service for the earlier conflicts but that would not do.  Although this would have saved some effort, I really thought the project deserved French artillerymen in bicorne.  Something about bicornes for these earlier campaigns I simply find appealing.  Austrians in casquets are cool too, right?  


Now, Austrian artillerymen wore bicornes throughout both periods so I could get away with using the existing Austrian guns for this project.  My thought is to maintain some integrity within the 1799 project and field AB guns and crew for the Austrians as well.  Probably time for a small order to Eureka USA.

24 comments:

  1. I think that you're correct that of you're going to filed French Republican forces, they need some Bicorned artillery support top keep the right "look".

    These definitely "look the look"!

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    1. We are in agreement. What would you suggest for the Austrian artillery for the 1796-1800 period: bicornes, casquets, or a mix?

      While all of my Austrian foot thus far are in casquet, I plan to add some in helmet too. What do you think about that?

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    2. Versatility (vis a vis use up to 1809) is a virtue. The helmet is my preferred headgear for my own Austrians!

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    3. RE: Helmets.

      Can't argue with that! Austrians in helmets are simply cool and the color en masse is striking! The Austrians in my "other" 15mm Napoleonic project have a mix of helmet and shako with Hungarians mostly in shako. For the Germans, headgear is split with the edge going to helmet.

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  2. That's a great project, and these AB figures are excellent!

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  3. I'm still managed to get impressed with the painting results possible in 15mm, and the period you've chosen is just wonderful. The bicorne French and their "little General" certainly has its charm.

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    1. The French in bicorne certainly do have charm as so the Austrians in casquet. Very interesting period and one in which I rarely see played out on the gaming table.

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  4. AB are always marvelous figures to paint up... I can see your artillery units with or without the bicorne or shakos? to do battle at Eylau 1807 against the Russians...

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    1. With a steady hand and good eye, ABs do look great. French guns with a mix of headgear would work for Eylau.

      The 1807 campaign is one I have never gamed. My Russian and Prussians are in the later period (1812+) uniforms.

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  5. Great looking troops and guns, Jonathan. AB is the way to go for the scale too.

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    1. Thank you, Dean! AB are very good sculpts, for sure.

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  6. Love 'em Jonathan! Perhaps a down payment on a Grande Batterie?

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    1. Hi Monty! No grand batteries during this time period. In Switzerland and northern Italy they were lucky to get more than a few guns hauled up over the very difficult terrain. Grand batteries come much later.

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    2. Ah, that makes sense.

      When I used to play Napoleonics, it was later war with an emphasis on Russia v France. I hated being the guy charged with facing massed French or Russian guns.

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    3. I wouldn't envy standing up against a massed gun line either. Of course, your commanding officer probably said something like, "you gotta break a few eggs..."

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  7. Very nice Jonathan and you can't go wrong with AB figures.

    Christopher

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    1. Nope, can't go wrong turning to ABs. Thanks for your comments!

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  8. They look great. I must admit I have never given the early period much attention but they really look the business.

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    1. Thanks, Matt! It is an interesting period with the advantage being that the battles are smaller and artillery does not dominate the battlefield the way it does in the later years of the wars.

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  9. Hi Jonathan:
    Sorry I haven't been keeping up with your blog but I was stopped in my tracks by these lovely figures. Early French in bicornes are indeed very cool and you ave a crack looking battery that could be very versatile - I suspect, not sure but I suspect, that these are essentially the same uniforms that Kellerman's artillerists wore at Valmy? You've chosen an interesting campaign - I need to have a look at Road to Rivoli.
    Well done!
    MP

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    1. Michael! Glad you stopped by for a look! You know, you are under no obligation to visit the blog but I appreciate it when you do.

      Yes, these would be essentially the same artillery dreas as at Valmy. Road to Rivoli is a great read!

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  10. Replies
    1. Appreciate the kind comment, Paul and thank you for dropping by for a visit!

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