Friday, February 16, 2018

SYW Prussian Cuirassier Regiment #10 Gendarmes

With Jake fielding SYW Russians at a feverish pace in anticipation of a planned Zorndorf battle in August (see Jake's Zorndorf project), two squadrons of Prussian Cuirassiers were pushed through my painting queue in response.
While I have yet to formulate an OB for the Prussians I will be fielding on the day of battle, Jake is a step ahead and has OBs for both Russians and Prussians available.  Without confirming, the size of the collection leaves little doubt that all Prussian units necessary for Zorndorf already have been mustered out and ready for service.
Today's addition to the 18mm SYW project is a dozen 18mm Eureka Prussian Cuirassiers called up as two squadrons of the 10th Gendarmes regiment.  A second dozen heavy cavalry await in the painting queue but many a unit wait in line before its planned appearance at the workbench.
With a steady parade of completed units marching across the blog in February, perhaps it is time to interject something different?  While no game has seen action on the table recently, the exploits of the Third Battle of Mollwitz wait to be told as well as travelogues from a January foray into the Mexican Yucatan.  Work remains on exploring Switzerland too including a visit to Chateau de Grandson on the banks of Lake Neuchatel.

32 comments:

  1. A solid looking unit waiting for a game.

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    1. Thank you, Peter. SYW seems to be getting more than its share of attention on my gaming table.

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  2. At last! The Prussians will have a fighting chance! (Rolls eyes). :-)

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    1. I am looking at Chotusitz as a more even WAS match-up; hopefully more evenly matched than Mollwitz.

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    1. Thanks, Ray! Very good to see you dropping in more frequently!

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  4. That is a very nice looing unit Jonathan. There is just something about cuirassiers in white, riding knee to knee that looks breathtaking yet sinister at the sane time.

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    1. Thanks, Mark! Knee-to-knee is the way to fight.

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  5. A beautiful - and probably effective - regiment!

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    1. Thanks, Phil! When under my command, I expect effectiveness!

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  6. Very nicely done. I see that the trumpeters were on greys which is my default option. I have often thought about trying to work out which nations didn't do this, but have never actually got round to doing it as yet.

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    1. Thank you, Lawrence. I put my musicians on greys when I remember. It makes a good contrast and an easily spotted musician.

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  7. Great looking cuirassiers! White is a great colour for heavy cavalry I think!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks, Iain! SYW cuirassiers are sharp dressers.

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  8. Go the prussians ....nice work 😀

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    1. Thanks! Hope you are still rooting for Prussia when I take on the scourge of the Steppes in Zorndorf.

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  9. Very nice looking cavalry! Entries like this have me reconsidering doing SYW in 15mm instead of 28mm. So much more practicable.

    Christopher

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  10. Another fantastic unit. There are times when I feel I'd like to paint every unit in the 7YW Prussian army, but therein lies madness! The battle report for Mollwitz would be great.

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    1. Thank you, Nathan! I still have a long way to go to field every unit but the storage boxes are certainly getting heavy from painted lead.

      As for Mollwitz #3 BatRep, I would like to get that out but I have been busy painting. Besides, BatRepping takes more effort than a leisurely painting session.

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  11. If I didn't already paint Napoleonics, I would go for 18th century armies, what we call in french "la guerre en dentelles". Very inspiring painting job !

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  12. Sharp (no "e") looking cuirassiers, Jon. I wasn't aware the trumpeters had red lace on their tricorns; much like the Napoleonic practice of red plumes for Prussian Trumpeters.

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    1. Thank you, Peter! The red trim on the musician is also similar to the Austrians' use of a red comb on the helmet for musicians. Musicians are always a bit different, right ex-bandsman?

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