Wednesday, November 18, 2015

1859 Austrian IR#37

Having survived Tuesday's wicked windstorm (gusts topping 70mph!) with some damage to property, work returns briefly to the 1859 project as the grenadier battalion of IR#37 marches off from the painting desk.  These 18 figures complete the four battalions of IR#37.  Figures are Old Glory as are almost all of the Austrians for this project, thus far.  One or two battalions of Lancashire Games' Austrians have been fielded and a number of Lancashire Austrians remain to get their swipe of the paint brush. 
In the painting queue for the 1859 project are more Lancashire French infantry and Old Glory Turcos and Zouaves.  The Turcos and Zouaves will add some interesting color to the already quite colorful French army.  Unfortunately for the 1859 project, other projects are vying for attention too.  Next off the painting desk will be 28mm WWII Germans and British to round out one platoon of each for Chain of Command.  Those WWII figures will be closely followed off the painting desk by a dozen Foundry Cossacks for the Great Game.
Having nearly three years passed since the last Pass-in-Review of the 1859 project (see Pass-in-Review DEC 2012), it is time to hold another such event.  By my calculation, the project has nearly doubled in size in those three, intervening years with a steady stream of units making it across the painting desk.  This would be a good exercise to set aside for the long Thanksgiving weekend fast approaching.  

22 comments:

  1. A very fine looking regiment Jonathan!

    Christopher

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  2. Fine looking fellows all.

    I had not seen that Pass in Review post before and went back to have a look. They look top notch. There's nothing like serried ranks of toy soldiers to warm the heart is there?

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    1. Nothing like the feeling of empowerment as you array your vast minions out onto the table.

      We should pledge to do this activity more often. Our good comrade, Der Alte Fritz, performs this activity on a regular basis. We should follow his lead!

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  3. Another great looking regiment Jon. I'm afraid that if I held a pass in review it would consist a whole pile of unpainted lead!

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    1. Thanks, Nate! The size of a project can catch one by surprise whether painted or unpainted. Maybe we all would have a bit more restraint if we paraded our unpainted lead out on the table occasionally? Interesting notion!

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  4. Nicely done on the Austrians. Looking forward to your Foundry Cossacks, those are some of my favorite minis.

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    1. Thank you, Jason! The Foundry Cossacks are from the Crimean War range. I hope those are the ones that you like.

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  5. Very nice looking battalion, Jon. Pardon my ignorance of these later uniforms, but how do you know it's the Grenadier battalion as opposed to a regular one. By this era, do all Austrian units have the red collar patches, i.e., no more facing colors by regiment?

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    1. Thank you, Peter! From a distance and in 15mm, there is not much noticeable difference between the line and grenadier battalions. Grenadier battalions still typically maintained a saber in addition to the bayonet. All other uniform components were the same. As for the facing colors, Austrian regiments still carried regimental facings. On campaign, the Austrians often wore the kittel whose only regimental distinction was the regimental facing color on collar tabs. The more formal waffenrock still had facing colored cuffs and collar. The collar tabs are red for the 37th since red is the regimental facing color. Other regiments had the same facing color scheme as their earlier Napoleonic brethren.

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  6. Great stuff Jonathan? Looking forward to seeing the full review!

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    1. Thank you, Mark! I might surprise myself at how the project has grown.

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  7. lovely brush work and figures Jon!

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    1. Phil, I always appreciate your kind support!

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  8. Sounds like you've got some extreme weather over there Jon! Good thing you can bunker down at the painting desk while your garden is getting a free "redecoration". With the 1859 collection now doubled in sized, it seems we're in for some cool pics of a coming game. What rules are you going to use - Grand Tactical or other?

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    1. Extreme weather, for sure! The city looks like a war zone four days after the storm.

      As for an 1859 game, I have been pondering that very notion. With some French troops available, I might expand San Martino to include more of the expansive battlefield to the west and south. Maybe I should look into Magenta too?

      First, I need to get the figures out of boxes and onto the table for a parade.

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  9. Lovely work as always, Jonathan. Sorry to hear of the storm damage. We were lucky, thousands of other Puget Sounders were out of power for a few days.

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    1. Appreciate the kind words, Dean. My daughter and her family have been staying with us since Tuesday due to continued power outages throughout the city. We suffered minor damage to roof and fence but at least our power was only out for 12 hours.

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