Thursday, December 18, 2014

1st Afghan War British

Off the painting desk this evening is a 24 figure regiment of British from the China range but destined to see service elsewhere.  These bell-topped shako, Wargames Foundry figures could see service during the First Afghan War, Indian Mutiny and even the Sikh Wars.  Great figures with superb sculpting!  

Marching out in their summer white trousers and yellow facings, these lads can muster as one of the many yellow faced regiments in the British arsenal deployed to India and the NW Frontier.  Colours are yet to be granted.
With the completion of this regiment, I can now field two British infantry regiments (or companies depending on game scale) in Kevin's expanding mid-19th Century Northwest Frontier project.  The earlier regiment can be seen here.
The sculpts for these Foundry figures were very enjoyable to paint but units of 24 is a bit much to tackle at one go.  I much prefer 12-16 28mm figures at one time.

20 comments:

  1. Great work Jonathan, and an interesting period too.

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    1. Thank you, Nate, and I agree. Very interesting period.

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  2. Great looking regiment, Jon. The mid 18th century uniforms are pretty nice, actually. I almost never paint less than 30 28mm infantry at a time myself... up to 90 at a time on occasion! You still manage to paint more total, so maybe your way isn't such a bad idea :-)

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    1. Thanks, Peter. I really cannot fathom painting 90 28s at one time. My painting desk does not even have the space for that let alone work area.

      One benefit of smaller painting units (would that be PUs?) is that fewer figures per unit means less likelihood of bogging down. Keeps the productivity up!

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  3. Very nice work Jonthan. I must admit, I always sigh a little when I see the bell topped shako - mainly because working in 1/72 I sort of hand wave that kind of thing and use chaps in stove pipes.

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    1. Conrad! Thank you! Sometimes we must make do with what is available. I see nothing wrong with the notion of being "close enough." I DO like the bell top shako, though!

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  4. Now that's a unit - no shortcuts just a whopping 24 figure massive wall of lead. Like you said, it's a lot of work, but it looks damn fine when finished! Very impressive and will no doubt look amazing on the gaming table.

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    1. Very kind of you, Soren! Units composed of 24, 28s is a pleasant sight on the gaming table. Unless, of course, I am facing a wall of them on the attack!

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  5. You are always productive! Very fine work on these Jonathan.

    Christopher

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    1. Thank you, Christopher! I appreciate you stopping by for a look.

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  6. Imposing and beautiful! 19th Century Northwest Frontier is another era I don't know so I'll be looking over your shoulder during the test.

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    1. Thank you, Monty!

      I am more familiar with the later, Second Afghan War in 1879 so I am learning about the First Afghan War and the Sikh Wars too.

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  7. Excellent job on these, another splendid unit!

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    1. Phil, always great to get your encouragement!

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  8. They look superb, Jonathan. A great period with lots of possibilities too.

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    1. Yes, an era having many possibilities with a number of varying adversaries.

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  9. Lovely stuff, Jonathan, another finely painted unit and another whopping piece of work. There is something rather sad about the 1st Afghan War and the prospect of an army marching over the mountains to its doom. I hope these fellows have a happier fate.
    M

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    1. Thank you kindly, Michael!

      A tragedy for sure and a lesson that continues to be relearned to this day. Fortunately, our soldiers only leave behind lead wives and lead orphans.

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